Precis File
SHIP NAME:NinoKEY:NUM. ENTRIES:5
sourceMarshall Islands
typeL
volume
material
dead0
linkhttp://www.register-iri.com/investigationreports/nino.pdf


sourceMETS
typeA
volume
material
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link

Nino, which ran aground on a sandbar, was stuck half a kilometre offshore from the pristine Dwesa nature reserve south of Coffee Bay. It was carrying thousands of tons of petrol and diesel fuel. METS assisted the salvage crew with the assembly of flotation pipes, which were transported by sea to the Nino. Fuel was transferred into the tug and transported to East London, where we assisted the crew in transferring the oil from the tug to a barge in East London harbour. METS spent a total of 10 days on the casualty site.


sourceDaily Dispatch 2002-07-21
typeA
volume
material
dead0
link

Johannesburg - The tanker Nino and the cargo carrier TMP Sagittarius remained firmly aground off the Eastern Cape coast on Sunday morning, Smit Marine SA's marine director Captain Dave Main, in charge of efforts to salvage both, said. "At the moment the priority is to prevent any oil spill," he said. Salvage operations are notoriously complex and strongly influenced by variables such as the weather and sea conditions, which meant it could take up to six weeks.

The tanker Nino, which ran aground on a sandbar on Thursday, was still stuck half a kilometre offshore from the pristine Dwesa nature reserve south of Coffee Bay. It is carrying thousands of tons of petrol and diesel fuel. SA Kuswag 1, a Department of the Environment and Tourism pollution control vessel, and the Wolraad Woltemade a Smit Marine salvage tug, were standing by in deeper water. "Our main objective is to keep her cargo aboard. Our team on the tanker is moving her cargo around. Fortunately the ship was not fully loaded so she has empty tanks. We are moving her cargo into safer areas. When that is done, then depending on the wind we will refloat her." He said sea and weather conditions were better, but still not ideal. "It is not called the Wild Coast for nothing," Main said.

In a statement on Friday, UK-based Columbia Shipmanagement Ltd, the agency which manages the ship, said 10 officers and ratings remained on board to assist the salvage master and his team. On Thursday, an Oryx helicopter from Durban's 15 Squadron airlifted 16 crew members from the Nino and took them to East London. On Friday, the same chopper evacuated the ship's captain, who suffered an apparent heart attack after his vessel went aground. He was taken to East London's St Dominic's hospital for a medical check and was on Saturday pronounced fit to return to the vessel.

The Nino was in the meantime "ballasted down" to avoid excessive movement during high tides and a towline rigged to her stern to hold the vessel at 90 degrees to the shoreline.


sourceSMIT
typeD
volumeN
material
dead
link

Product tanker carrying gasoline and diesel oil ran aground off East London – South Africa. SMIT personnel and equipment were mobilised both from Rotterdam and Cape Town. A large marine spread, including the well-known salvage tug Wolraad Woltemade, were involved in the operation and after having removed both bunkers and part cargo the vessel was refloated and towed to Durban. This operation was a unique event as this was the first vessel to be successfully refloated from the treacherous South African coast.


sourceCTX
typeD
volumeN
material
dead
link

The Marshall Islands link is the official flag state report, and it is a pretty good one. What's really unusual it that they put it on the web with about six other reports. Why they picked this six out of the hundreds of MI flag casualties, I have no idea.

Anyway the problem started with problems with the radar, then the gyro compass, compounded by the fact that the AB on watch left the bridge an hour before the grounding, and never came back, leaving the 2/0 by himself. Visibility was poor in intermittant rain squalls. The 2/O did not react properly to all these problems, and only belatedly checked his postion with the GPS which was on the chart table. About the time he realized he was in trouble, and went hard port to get offshore, the ship grounded hard. just a few hundred yards off the shore, in the surf zone.

When the master realized he could not get the off with his own power, he did a smart thing. He ballasted down. He did this to prevent the ship pounding in the surf. But he also improved his hydrostatic balance dramatically. The fact that the ship had already part discharged also helped matters.

Weather was at times bad while she was stranded. A South African air force spokesman, talking about the helicopter rescue of half of the crew on the day of the grounding said "It's raining, high speed winds, up to 8 metre swells." The latter seems unlikely. But photos in the MI report show the ship was clearly in the surf zone with waves breaking over her stern. Photo at the Smit site shows a large wave breaking over the main deck.

On July 31st the ship was refloated, after redistributing the cargo and lightering about 2000 m3 of cargo and fuel oil, one of the very few successful refloats off the South African coast. Despite extensive damage requiring 925 tons of steel, there is no report of any spillage. The MI report explicitly claims there was none. This was a single hull lship. Apparently wave pumping was ineffective.

Almost all the damage was very low. The Marshall Islands report has some pretty good pictures. The Master's decision to ballast down, not only saved his ship, but also resulted in nil spillage, a point the MI report does not mention.